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We are open for walk-ins Tuesday-Thursday, 10am-2pm and appointments Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm.

ANNUAL REPORT 2020

“THE MARIN COMMUNITY FOUNDATION admires and appreciates Community Action Marin’s commitment to fighting for equity and social justice in our community and is happy to be a long-standing funding and thought partner. We share important alignment on critical issues of our day, ranging from quality childcare to civic participation to economic empowerment. We look forward to continued partnership with Community Action Marin for years to come.”

—Johnathan Logan, VP of Community Engagement, Marin Community Foundation
 

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Dear Community and Colleagues,

For all of us the world over, 2020 was an unusual year. It had startling moments of challenge—and opportunity. Of necessity and guided by inner strength, our communities in Marin County developed greater resilience during the pandemic. People and organizations cooperated and renewed commitment to what sustains humanity through difficulty: compassion, empathy, and trust.  We took risks, and we emerged stronger together. 

At our agency, our team led new programs in response to urgent needs. Staff adapted and services grew to meet the health and economic crises, both of which impacted our communities of color and low-wage workers disproportionately. Those who could stepped up, and we mobilized more private, government, and agency resources to make sure that people found in us a caring partner in hard times.  

There was much to do. Services moved online, and when most critical, we maintained careful protocols for necessary in-person work including childcare and homeless outreach. We led as an essential services provider in supporting the county’s essential workforce: from doctors and nurses to attendants and service laborers.  Our organic production farm alleviated many families’ food insecurities, and we partnered alongside county disaster service staff to get people under a safe roof. Importantly, we also elevated the voices of community through media outlets and advocated for policies to produce fair and lasting change.  

All of this was made possible because we stood together. Across the county, our work was strengthened by donors, volunteers, and partners all wanting to ensure that Marin works for all of us. As we look back on what was, let us take forward our learnings and successes to inspire what’s to come. We will continue to need one another to get to racial and economic equity among us.  

I look forward to our continued and strengthened partnership.

Warmly,

Chandra Alexandre
Chief Executive Officer

OUR MISSION. We make it possible for people to achieve well-being by providing the education, mental health, and vital services they need. Together, we break down the barriers that get in the way of fair and lasting change in service to better outcomes for all.

FOR OVER 50 YEARS, STAFF HAVE TACKLED THE CHALLENGES OF POVERTY.

The team strives daily to remove barriers, respond to urgent and pressing needs, and get rid of the social inequities that hinder people’s ability to thrive. This year, the agency strengthened its approach to ensuring improved outcomes at individual, agency, and community levels.  

What does this look like? There is no wrong door. People are put at the center of our work to connect them to what’s most needed now and to create a roadmap with them to their dreams. Strong, trusted relationships make self-sufficiency possible for over 5,000 households each year—and growing. 

 

SAFETY NET:

WE’RE THERE WHEN YOU NEED A HAND UP. 

We help people lift themselves up, covering unexpected financial emergencies so they can keep a roof over their heads and the lights on at home. This year, we gave away cash grants for the first time, supplementing this with rent or mortgage payments and other supports like CalFresh and emergency food boxes as people sought pandemic relief. Our Community Alternative Response and Engagement (CARE) Teams helped unhoused people find shelter, stay safe, and get the help they needed.  

 

CHILDREN AND FAMILY SERVICES:

A GREAT START IN LIFE AND PEACE OF MIND. 

We help set children up to do well in school and later in life by giving them a safe, caring, home-away-from-home to have fun, learn and explore. Parents have peace of mind knowing their children are getting the free and affordable, high-quality, early education they need and deserve. This year, we kept our doors open so that low-wage and essential workers and people of low income could get to school, work, or look for a job.  

 

ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY & WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT:

SHORT-TERM SUPPORT AND LONG-TERM SECURITY.

We work with community members to take charge of their finances to build a brighter future. Through one-on-one financial and credit coaching, career advice and tax services, they’re able to grow their income and create a more secure future. This year, we launched a new pilot program to help homeless and precariously housed women connect with the skills and employer connections needed to land a job.  

 

MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES:

PUTTING RECOVERY WITHIN REACH. 

We help individuals and their families access the tools they need to manage their recovery journey. This year, we launched new support groups and warm line help in Spanish, extended service hours to meet pandemic stressors like anxiety, isolation, and depression head-on, and taught staff and community the skills needed for peer specialist certification. 

 

EQUITY INITIATIVES:

FOR THE PEOPLE OF MARIN BY THE PEOPLE OF MARIN. 

We rally support, collaborate, and advocate for changes to laws and policies that help to level the playing field. This year, from food justice to an equitable pandemic response, we used our influence and voice to make sure our entire community could achieve stability and well-being.  

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SAFETY NET_TITLES

WE'RE THERE WHEN YOU NEED A HAND UP.

THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC HAD A SIGNIFICANT IMPACT ON COMMUNITY.

Changes brought on by shelter-in-place orders meant that many people who had been living from paycheck to paycheck, the vast majority of whom were people of color, immigrants, veterans, and low-wage workers, suddenly found themselves in crisis and in need of emergency help.

KEEPING THE HEAT & LIGHTS ON
With a temporary moratorium on service disconnections arising from non-payment of utility bills, households began to incur significant debt as those with reduced incomes concentrated on putting food on the table and meeting more pressing needs to stay housed.  The agency’s Low Income Housing Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) ensured that income-eligible households with utility bills (including wood and propane) could pay them. 

FREE INCOME TAX PREPARATION
Even with the proliferation of free on-line tax tools, many low-income households don’t have access to the technology that is required to use those services. Our Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program (VITA) pairs households with volunteers who are certified tax preparers. Last year and despite a shorter program year due to shelter-in-place restrictions, our volunteer team prepared taxes for 111 households and helped community receive over $200,000 in refunds.

STREET OUTREACH BROUGHT PEOPLE INDOORS
With critical attention on public health and a cross-county effort to reach as many unhoused people as possible, the agency’s community alternative response & engagement (care) teams acted quickly to help. 

Partnering with local government and other community-based organizations as part of the county’s continuum of care, team members worked tirelessly to get people sheltered and immediate needs met during the pandemic. CARE Teams ensured a warm hand, supplies, access to COVID-19 testing and medical care, as well as shelter whenever possible.

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approximately 750 families received direct cash assistance totaling $375,000

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over 660 families received energy assistance totaling $310,000

*Cash, rental and LIHEAP assistance provided through June 30th.

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approximately 500 families and individuals received over $1.3 million in rental assistance

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our CARE teams had more than 50 daily contacts with people experiencing homelessness

AT A GLANCE:

  •  RENTAL ASSISTANCE increased six-fold to reach 887 people
  •  FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE reached 1,228 households, 15 times more than the prior year
  •  MORE THAN 20 tents and OVER 40 sleeping bags distributed to the unhoused
  •  MORE THAN 1,500 bag lunches and OVER 150 hygiene kits distributed
  •  OVER 60 people received cell phones to ensure tele-health and census participation
  •  779 HOUSEHOLDS received utilities assistance

In the past year, distributing packages of potentially life-saving face masks, hand sanitizer and soap, necessities like warm socks, sleeping bags, tents, and comforts like cookies and candy, has been my daily routine. It’s an uplifting job. This week, I moved an older gentleman into his first apartment after years of sleeping on buses and in abandoned buildings. After many months building up his trust and helping him stabilize through basic supports, watching him visit home for the first time, well, that was very rewarding. 

                – Debra Walker, CARE Team Outreach Worker

Children and family
CHILDREN_TITLES

A GREAT START IN LIFE AND PEACE OF MIND.

FREE AND AFFORDABLE HIGH-QUALITY CHILDCARE.

By ensuring that first essential workers, and then enrolled families, had access to child care as soon as shelter-in-place orders went into effect, families received a crucial resource for economic stability.  In response to the public health crisis, staff aligned resources to ensure that this past year, over 550 children received a safe, caring, home-away-from-home to have fun, learn and explore. Remote preschool also strengthened connections across social distance, with online chats, videos, lessons, at-home activities, and information all ensuring that little ones kept busy with fun and learning.  

As the county’s Head Start operator and largest provider of state-subsidized child care, the agency’s team ensures that children ages 0-5 from families of low-income get access to comprehensive health and early education services to ensure their well-being. The team partners with families to identify strengths, needs, interests, and goals. These support family well-being, foster parent child relationships, connect families to peers and community, support parents to be advocates for their children and to be leaders in their community. 

Families also gain the knowledge, skills, and access to opportunities that better prepare them for steps to self-sufficiency and thriving through the agency’s team of success coaches. Working together, staff help to increase children’s school readiness, open doorways to greater economic mobility for families, support mental health and wellness, and meet urgent needs. Every working day, the Children and Family Services team provides high-quality early education, nutrition, health and wellness offerings while also fostering family engagement, partnerships and referrals.  Our team’s goal is to ensure that children enter kindergarten ready to learn and that families are prepared to succeed according to their dreams for today and tomorrow. 

LEARNING PODS
When two staff members disclosed that if they didn’t have childcare for their own school-age children they would have to resign from their positions, the Learning Pod classroom idea was born. These staff members faced a dilemma: How could they return for duty as teachers in their agency classrooms while their own children would need to meet at-home, remote learning obligations? 

Community Action Marin has operated after-school programs for many years. The team had experience and know-how to make this work; they just needed space! A highly motivated group, staff came together on a Saturday morning and transformed a storage building into a beautiful Learning Pod classroom complete with high-speed Wi-Fi. With support from the San Rafael Fire Department and Community Care Licensing, the agency’s new program was licensed and up and running in less than a week—and the agency retained key staff.  To date, 33 school-age children have attended the Learning Pod program at two locations, receiving academic support, subject specific tutoring, and even art class.

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CHILDREN, AGES 0-5
participated in a
Community Action Marin
Head Start program in 2020

SCHOOL-AGE CHILDREN
have participated in our Learning Pod program at two locations

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Children in the learning pod enjoy a culinary activity.

“My 3 YEAR OLD IS IN THE PROGRAM. When I started a few years ago, I got involved in the policy council and was able to learn and apply my leadership skills. I was ultimately elected as vice president of the council and also had the opportunity to continue my education. Once I completed my studies, I became a teacher with the agency and enjoy the opportunity to support my son’s education and motivate him to pursue his own dreams and reach his goals.” 

                -Maria Urias

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FOOD JUSTICE_TITLES

BUILDING WAYS TO COMBAT FOOD INSECURITY.

FOOD INSECURITY AMONG FAMILIES WE SERVE IN MARIN COUNTY BECAME MORE VISIBLE AND PERSISTENT.

We responded and continue to strengthen our agency’s ability to meet community food needs. This past year, dedicated partners, staff, and volunteers broke ground on a production farm and established a beautiful outdoor learning classroom.

The farm serves as a central location to provide fresh produce for families, education about sustainable agriculture through farm to school programs, and healthy ingredients to create the meals that feed students in our programs.  From getting the soil ready, to planting seeds and trees, to having our first harvest in the spring, children and families have been involved every step of the way and have helped to transform what was previously a dumping ground into bounty.

THE CENTRAL KITCHEN is where we prepare breakfast, lunch, and snacks for the hundreds of children participating in our free and affordable high-quality child development programs. The fresh ingredients grown in our production farm and school gardens go back into our kitchen’s food cycle, helping to promote about healthy eating and active living. Many families rely on these free meals as a primary source of nutrition for their children. To date, the central kitchen has delivered over 2.5 million culturally appropriate meals, including breakfast, lunch, and snack daily.

The kitchen also provides microenterprise opportunities as a vital space for select local business owners and entrepreneurs to operate and grow small food service and culinary businesses.  This also gives the agency earned income to continue growing its impact for food justice.

in 4

FAMILIES IN MARIN
are struggling to put food on the table

OUR PROGRAMS HAVE DELIVERED OVER

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 meals, making sure that children of low (and very low) income have nutritious meals daily.

“Our goal is to provide the most healthy, organic food for our children. All of the food that is grown in our farms go to our Central Kitchen to prepare our children’s meals. It’s a full circle of growing, children working in the soil, and learning about science and nutrition and health, and then that food actually comes back in the meals that we serve.” 

                -Monique Liebhard, VP, Children & Family Services

Volunteers

PROVIDING CRITICAL SUPPORT FOR OUR AGENCY'S EFFORTS TO SERVE IN OUR COMMUNITY

Every year, community members step up to make a difference in the lives of others. Whether helping to keep our farm vibrant, supporting our outreach to community members, or assisting with food distributions, it’s because of individuals who care that children and families continue to be served at a high quality.  

Juan Morellos-Rico

JUAN MORELLOS-RICO
OLD GALLINAS CHILDREN'S CENTER VOLUNTEER

When Juan moved his small family to Marin from Mexico, he jumped right in to volunteer at several different nonprofits in the county. He joined our agency about 10 years ago, helping at Old Gallinas Children’s Center when his oldest son enrolled. Now, Juan’s five-year old grand-daughter is also part of our child care services family. Juan helps with gardening and cleaning when needed and is now making a vital contribution to our lunch distribution efforts. “What makes me happy is seeing smiles on the children’s faces. Thank you for giving me the opportunity to help our families!”

Amanda McCarthy

AMANDA McCARTHY
BOARD OF DIRECTORS VOLUNTEER

“Fighting for our kids and getting to know this large network of activists throughout Marin County was transformational.” Amanda McCarthy believes in acting locally and helping to build community. As a former parent in the program, a volunteer, member of the Board and a donor, Amanda is fully committed to advancing the work of the agency. She believes that every resident of Marin County should know what Community Action Marin is, what the agency does, and look to it for leadership. As Amanda says, “We are all different, but all share a common goal of a better life for our children.”

Leslie klor

LESLIE KLOR
HOUSING NAVIGATOR VOLUNTEER

Leslie Klor’s lifelong passion and expertise as an affordable housing advocate is put to use in the service of Marin residents and families as a Housing Navigator volunteer. She is widely known and highly regarded in Marin County for her commitment to affordable housing. Her role as a volunteer is to inform and explain housing options such as Section 8, subsidized housing, shared housing and shelters so that people can make informed decisions. In spite of the hardship she witnesses, Leslie savors many success stories of which she’s been a part and enjoys helping community members secure the housing they need

VOLUNTEERS SUPPORTED THESE IMPORTANT EFFORTS AND MORE

  • Old Gallinas Children’s Center
  • Production Farm build and set-up
  • Food distribution for families once the pandemic shelter-in-place orders began
  • Financial and career coaching
  • Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program during the tax season
  • Head Start Playground Activity Painting

BECOME A VOLUNTEER
and help impact the community through
these important efforts and more
Visit camarin.org/volunteer to get started

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SHORT-TERM SUPPORT AND LONG-TERM SECURITY.

STAFF AND VOLUNTEER SUCCESS COACHES WORKING ON ECONOMIC MOBILITY THIS PAST YEAR connected clients to safety net and financial capability services that allowed them to meet basic needs and make progress toward long-term goals.

CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES
Delivering services remotely and creating new programs to meet community needs required determination, patience, partnership, and skills. Focusing on equitable access for all, the team offered one-on-one orientations, put welcome videos online, added pick-up and drop-off boxes outside the main office building for documents, and helped clients complete intake paperwork over the phone.  We tested ourselves to be innovative, creative, and forward-thinking. Now, staff are better able to serve community with greater awareness of barriers and how to remove them. We have streamlined services across the agency, fostered better collaborations, and strengthened our no-wrong-door approach to helping people and changing lives.

OLDER ADULT ECONOMIC SECURITY
The team provided high-touch coaching services to 37 individuals over age 60, all of whom became long-term clients. More astonishing than 100% enrollment in coaching is that in this time of isolation, housing insecurity, and high unemployment, 86% of older adult clients achieved at least 5% progress in one or more key financial indicators: savings/assets, credit, income and debt. Twenty-nine percent of older adult clients self-identify as people of color in a county where over 85% of individuals reported being white on the 2010 U.S. census, a success largely due to a focus on and commitment to racial equity.

WORKFORCE PILOT
The California Workforce Accelerator Fund provided the resources needed to launch an innovative pilot during the pandemic. The program provides 13 homeless women comprehensive services across education and training, small business advising, career counseling, stabilization and basic needs, health and wellness (including mental health support) and financial coaching. The goal of the program is to partner with each woman to create stabilization, financial, career, and health and wellness plans and to work with them to achieve success in these areas with a focus on employment at a livable wage.

OVER HALF OF CLIENTS ACHIEVED

%

 self-sufficient income, 2 weeks of savings, or 600 credit score

%

of clients improved their savings, credit, or debt by 30% or more

AT A GLANCE:

  • Over 200 community members connected to services
  • 67% of clients made at least 5% progress in one or more financial indicators: income, savings, credit and debt 
  • 59% of clients made at least 30% progress in one or more financial indicators: income, savings,
    credit and debt
  • 57 individuals created and/or maintained a household budget
  • 28 people grew their assets, including a car or home purchase
  • 13 homeless or precariously housed women worked as a cohort to increase self-confidence, financial stability, and build pathways to employment

RACHEL RECOVERS HER SECURITY In July 2019, Rachel K. left an abusive relationship. She was at a low point in her life, suffering from depression, unemployed, and unable to meet her basic expenses. She knew she needed to get back on her feet financially and emotionally but was unsure where to start. 

A friend recommended she contact Community Action Marin. One month later, Rachel began meeting one-on-one with Debbie Brown, part of the agency’s success coach network focused on credit repair and tax returns for low-income community. Through Debbie's work, she helps people transform their finances, guiding and supporting them to financial self-sufficiency.

Having financial challenges can be emotionally draining and scary too. Addressing the emotional connection is just as important as dealing with the financial challenges. Over nine months, Debbie worked with Rachel to get her the tools and support she needed to take charge of her financial life. One of the first action steps Rachel took was to have a family meeting and share her situation with her children. Letting them know she needed assistance was difficult, but they stepped up immediately to help. They began having weekly video calls with Rachel to check on her progress and to offer support. One of her daughters volunteered to buy Rachel groceries to ease the burden on her monthly expenses. Debbie helped Rachel break down the obstacles she was facing, open her support network, and confront the fear that was holding her back from thriving. Soon, Rachel learned how to create a realistic monthly budget, methods to improve her credit, and the importance of having emergency savings. She even opened a new savings account and deposited her $1,200 Economic Impact Payment stimulus check to get it started. 

“I’m excited to see the positive changes that I’ve accomplished  and I am much happier. I even reunited with my siblings after 20 years!” Rachel shared. 

Knowing that she has money set aside to cover unforeseen expenses has made Rachel more confident and secure. Her coach is very proud of her accomplishments and will continue to support her as she moves to a positive financial future and greater self-sufficiency.

“You gave me a few suggestions and I followed through on those. It’s amazing because my credit score went from 550 and now it is 729, and I want to thank you for that as it’s incredible how quickly this turned around and things have gotten better for me!”

              -Anthony, coaching client

Mental Health
MENTAL HEALTH

PUTTING RECOVERY WITHIN REACH

RECOVERY IN COMMUNITY
An evidence-based practice, peer recovery ensures that both staff and clients achieve increased well-being together. With lived experience of mental health challenges, peer specialists help to improve mental health outcomes by strengthening social ties, support, and connections to relevant resources.

WARM LINES
The pandemic created greater isolation, loneliness, anxiety and stress. The Warm Line served as a connection for many experiencing mental health challenges to trained peers who provided a reliable source of comfort and support. Clients expressed relief and gratitude that they could reach out for help seven days a week and hear a voice in English or Spanish, get referrals to services, and find a trusted, confidential, and ready resource at the agency.  This year, there were 5,798 calls and connections on the Warm Lines.

FAMILY PARTNERS
Parents and family members of loved ones diagnosed with a severe mental illness get the support they need to navigate county resources from trained staff who know what it’s like. Family partners provided emotional support too in families’ journey toward wellness.

PEER MENTAL HEALTH
supports individuals and families with mental health and well-being, by connecting them with trained Peer Support Specialists. Our Peer Specialist Program supports individuals diagnosed with a severe and persistent mental illness in their healing and recovery. We work alongside case managers in Marin County’s Behavioral Health and Recovery Services to provide strengths-based support through lived experience and practical tools such as Wellness Recovery Action Plans (WRAPs).

Our Peer Education program provides individuals with lived experience the tools to become certified Peer Support Specialists, so they are equipped to assist others with their mental health wellness and recovery using evidence-based skills and resources.

calls were made to the WARMLINE
(English and Spanish)

clients received support from our helpful
FAMILY PARTNER SERVICES

clients experienced our encouraging
YOUTH MENTOR SERVICES

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there were over 7,000 visits to the ENTERPRISE RECOVERY CENTER in the past year

“I am blessed to blend my professional experience with my personal experience and provide direct assistance to families experiencing mental health crises. I am so satisfied when I hear a parent thank me for listening, for validating their frustrations. Many times, I am the first person who gets the situation they are experiencing with their children.”

                – MARK SOLOMONS, FAMILY PARTNER

equity
EQUITY

FOR MARIN, BY MARIN.

WORKING FOR JUST AND FAIR OUTCOMES

Marin County is a very wealthy place and the least equitable by race across all indicators of well-being in the state of California. Did you know that the poverty rate for families with children under five is highly concentrated in certain neighborhoods, reflecting a history of racial and economic inequities?

More than half of the county’s households pay 30% or more of their income in rent, living paycheck to paycheck. When surveyed during the pandemic, families said that reducing housing costs and improving employment prospects were top priorities. Child care too was a large need across families of low income.  Side-by-side in community, our efforts helped to disrupt systemic and structural inequities to give more people access to opportunity and self-sufficiency.

CIVIC ENGAGEMENT

  • CENSUS 2020. Together with more than 10 other organizations, we formed a coalition to get out the count, especially among hard-to-count populations.
  • VOTER REGISTRATION. A key to democracy, voter registration added to the agency’s service delivery in advance of the 2020 Presidential Election. Staff helped people register to vote and worked to ensure that community lifted up its power.
  • RACIAL AND ECONOMIC JUSTICE IS OUR AMERICA. On July 4th, 2020, community took to the streets in a car caravan to declare that Black Lives Matter and that democracy depends on the actions we take.

2020 EFFORTS:

  • INCREASED AWARENESS and agency among individuals and families  
  • STRENGTHENED ACCESS to resources, services, and power in community 
  • CHANGED CULTURE and practice
    to greater trauma-responsive and equitable outcomes 
  • CREATED POLICIES leading to more equitable impacts for people of low income and those hardest hit by the pandemic

LATINOS ARE 19% OF THE POPULATION BUT

%

of COVID cases

EMPLOYMENT FOR LOW-WAGE WORKERS IS DOWN

%

since January 2020 and only 6% for high-wage workers

PANDEMIC POLICY RESPONSE

In August 2020, agency leadership joined with community partners, local government, and others working to ensure recovery to call for urgent action in response to the needs of those hardest hit by the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Resolution passed from elected officials to commit to bold, equitable pandemic response.   
  • Marin County adopts limited rent freeze for pandemic relief.  
  • San Rafael City Council passed a rent freeze in the Canal neighborhood.   
  • Novato City Council passed a limited rent freeze for pandemic relief. 
  • Marin County Board of Supervisors passed an extension of the eviction moratorium through September 30, 2021.   
  • Board of Supervisors committed more than $5.6 million in federal grant money to address the local emergency of homelessness 
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THIS RECOGNITION comes at a time when we have been working hard alongside our community family to avert crisis and strengthen our resilience in the face of the covid-19 pandemic and the inequities it has revealed. It’s especially meaningful now; but we got here because our team has been dedicated to helping people help themselves and each other in Marin for over 50 years. On behalf of our staff and board, I am grateful for this honor, and we are proud to be recognized.”

-CHANDRA ALEXANDRE, CEO OF COMMUNITY ACTION MARIN

Each year, California Assemblymembers and State Senators are invited to honor a Nonprofit of the Year for their district. Assemblymember Marc Levine chose our agency for the 2020 California Nonprofit of the Year!

“On behalf of residents throughout the North Bay, I am proud to recognize Community Action Marin as the 2020 Nonprofit of the Year for Sonoma and Marin counties,” said Assemblymember Levine. “The COVID-19 pandemic has illuminated the need for community partners to help vulnerable families through this unimaginable time. For decades, Community Action Marin has been one of our most reliable partners to help fight poverty and to give a voice to everyone that calls the North Bay home. This year, the agency has stepped up once again and has been essential to help support Marin County residents impacted by COVID-19. Our community is stronger because of its leadership. I look forward to partnering with Community Action Marin in the future to build a healthier, more equitable community for us all.” 

This year, 105 legislators across the state recognized the important work of nonprofits in their community. This recognition brings attention to outstanding nonprofits while illustrating the remarkable diversity and vibrancy of California’s nonprofit community. 

FINANCIALS

The Agency revenues have been on an upward trajectory for the past two years, increasing from $17.7 million in year 2018-19 to nearly $20 million in 2019-20. The most significant difference between the two years is due to additional COVID-19 funding in relation to our Head Start and California Department of Education contracts and our Community Services Block Grant (CSBG). Additionally, increased rental assistance monies passed through the organization in light of increased community need during the pandemic. We have not operated with a deficit in either period. For every $1 of CSBG funds, the agency leveraged $66.12 from federal, state, local, and private resources, including the value of volunteer hours. For every $1 we spent on fundraising expenses last year, we raised nearly $23.

Please join us as a supporter by donating today! With a monthly gift, you become a Champion for Marin. Any gift helps our community become a place where everyone can thrive.

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BOARD
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Ellis G. “Joe” Simmons
President 

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Meredith Parnell
Vice President

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Danielle George
Secretary

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James T. McLean
Treasurer 

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Roger Crawford

MariaFrias

Maria Frias

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AMANDA N. McCARTHY

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Jennifer McInnis

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Tony Psychoyos

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Cheryl Timoney

“EVERY RESIDENT OF MARIN COUNTY should know what Community Action Marin is, what the agency does, and look to it for leadership. We are becoming the central, organized voice for our community and continue to build partnerships throughout the county. We are all different, but all share a common goal of a better life for our children. Join us!”

—Amanda N. McCarthy, Board Member

DEAR FRIENDS AND COMMUNITY,

I’m honored to be part of the meaningful change that has transpired in Marin County over the past year. We have endured much together; I know that 2020 opened my eyes to difficult realities in new ways and also gave me the chance to step up.

Acknowledging the hard work it has taken to provide excellent services during the pandemic, I want to celebrate the team—and especially our frontline staff at Community Action Marin. Whether offering affordable, high-quality childcare, financial coaching, conducting street outreach to homeless individuals and families, or simply being someone compassionate on the other end of the phone, our people know the struggles too many face. Most bring lived experience to their work and all have deep roots in community so that they’re standing side-by-side as they offer a hand up to the over 5,000 households we partner with each year.

I’m very proud that together, we rose to meet the urgent needs of individuals and families by making rapid adjustments to service offerings and establishing new programs. We joined coalitions for county-wide advocacy efforts and responded to the urgency of the moment without sacrificing health or safety, and we strengthened trust.

For me, it’s been a year of insight and renewed commitment to the power of community action. I began collaborating with a local Community Action Agency in Denver decades ago, and I’ve been paying attention to the drivers of racial and economic equity ever since. What I see now in Marin gives me hope.
If you’re inspired, like me, then join us!

I invite you to volunteer or look at a career with us. And if you can, give. Stepping up changes lives. We do it every day.

Sincerely,

JOE SIMMONS
BOARD PRESIDENT

TEAM

LEADERSHIP 

CHANDRA ALEXANDRE
Chief Executive Officer 

Kristine Aguilar*
Director of Comprehensive Health Services

HEATHER BETTINI
Director, Economic Opportunity & Workforce Development

Rommel Carrera*
Director of Family Services

Gina Guillemette*
Chief of Staff Fellow

DAWN HENSLEY
Director, Family Partnership

LAUREL HILL-LUBISZEWSKI
Director, Safety Net Services

MONIQUE LIEBHARD
Vice President, Children & Family Services

CHRIS MCCRUM
Advisor to the CEO

CASSANDRA A RISTINE
Human Resources Administrator

Elissa Roy*
Director of Development

Alanna Williams*
Director of Learning and Evaluation

*Joined mid-year 2020

STAFF

GAIDA ABUELQASEM
Teacher

MARLENE ADAM
Early Head Start Teacher

MAIRA AGUILAR  Associate Teacher

MARIA ALCARAZ Specialist, Client Intake

JORGE ALDANA-CIFUENTES Teachers Assistant I

IRIS ALLEN-WILLIS Manager, Peer Mental Health Direct Services

NATIVIDAD AMADOR
Site Supervisor

BRENDA ANDRADE Associate Teacher I

ZULLY MARCELA ANGULO
Associate Teacher I

MARICRUZ ASSEFNIA Workforce Manager

CHERYL AUGUST         Crisis Planning Counselor

NAJMA AZAM       Associate Teacher II

LORI BACKER
Supervisor

EVA BALLADARES
Early Head Start Teacher

ANDREZA BARRIOLA Teacher

CATHRINE BART Supervisor

JENNIFER BELL      Manager,
Inclusion Services

DEBORAH BERENBOIM Peer Case Aide

LADONNA BONNER Coordinator

SHERRY BRADLEY          Peer Case Aide

DEBRA BROWN Credit Coach & VITA Site Coordinator

SHUDDHA BUTLER
Manager,
Executive Office

MARIBEL CABRERA-BORLOZ
Career Coach

DIANIRA CALDERON Teachers Assistant I

YENIFER CALDERON Teachers Assistant I

BERTA CALERO    Associate Teacher II

ERIKA CANACASCO Teachers Assistant I

TERESA CARABES         Head Start Home Visitor

CINTHIA M CARRASCO-OYUELA
Teachers Assistant II

JENNIFER CARTER
Administrative/Marketing Assistant

VALERIE CARVER Associate Teacher I

MARTHA CASTILLO     Head Cook

MARIA A CAUICH Associate Teacher I 

HONORINA CERVANTES
Site Assistant 

SHEILA CHAMBERS Teacher

ROBERT CHIVERS Teachers Assistant I

EDNA PATRICIA CIFUENTES            Associate Teacher I

PAULA CIFUENTES Manager, Program Quality Support

THOMAS CLARK        Mobile Outreach Senior Peer Case Manager

ERICKA CORADO
Associate Teacher II

MARIA CORREA          Family Advocate

AMELIA CORTES  Associate Teacher II

LUZ ELENA DE LA ROSA
Associate Teacher I

PERLA DE LOS SANTOS
Early Head Start Teacher

DELMA DELEON     Teachers Assistant II

JENNIFER DELEON
Teacher

JESSICA DEMITRO
Census Outreach Associate

MAYRA DIAZ
Family Advocate

DEBBIE DOMINQUEZ-WIGGINS
Family Partner

MARIA EK CAN
Site Assistant

LEAH FAGUNDES
Manager, Enterprise Recovery Center

SADAF FAKHRI
Manager, Compliance & Development

HALI FLOREEN
MFT Peer Counselor

EDITH FLORES
Associate Teacher I

TRISHA FOLLINS
Teacher

ANITA FOWLER         Teacher

LUZ FUENTES
Assistant Teacher

ANGELICA GALINDO
Associate Teacher I

YOLANDA GALLEGOS
Early Head Start Teacher

MARIA GARCIA           Family Partner

PETRA GARCIA
Teacher

ASHLEY GIRDLER
Teacher

NILA GOMEZ
Teachers Assistant II

MARIA GONZALEZ Associate Teacher II

ROSELIA GONZALEZ
Early Head Start Teacher

IDA GREEN
Child & Family Coach

WILLIAM GROSS
Teacher

DAYRA GUTIERREZ
Assistant Teacher

OLGA GUZMAN
Associate Teacher I

ROSA GUZMAN
Early Head Start Teacher

SUSANA GUZMAN
Coordinator,
ERSEA Enrollment

MARIVIC HAMMARI
Associate Teacher

HODA HANFY               Payroll Specialist

FIROUZEH HEIDARPOUR
Associate Teacher II

DEEPIKA ERATHPATHIRANA Associate Teacher I

GUADALUPE HERNANDEZ-SANCHEZ
Associate Teacher II

ANA LUISA HERNANDEZ
Associate Teacher I

GABRIEL HERNANDEZ
Family Advocate

JUANA HERNANDEZ
Associate Teacher I

MICHELLE HERNANDEZ
Site Supervisor

TIMOTHY HICKS
Associate Teacher II

GUINEVERE HIDALGO
Learning & Resource Center Program Supervisor

JASMIN HUERTA
Associate Teacher I

SANDRA HUEY
Manager, Office & Operations

GARY INTERSIMONE
Manager, Finance

JOSEPH JACKSON
Youth Mentor

PATRICIA JACOBSON
Warmline Supervisor

GUADALUPE JARQUIN
Teachers Assistant I

LARRY JEAN
Youth Mentor

SUZANNE JESSUP
Peer Case Aide

POONAM JHA
Specialist,
Revenue & Budget

PAULA JIMENEZ  Specialist, Client Intake

LOENNDY JORGE DE LEON
Assistant Teacher

MONICA KAIJANKOSKI
Associate Teacher I

MICHELLE KEMP
Family Partner

AMBREEN KHAWAJA
Program Director

JUDITH KUNITZ
Manager, Health Services

CAROL LANG
Head Start Supervisor

DAPHNE LAUREL
Peer Case Aide

ALIDA LEON
Site Supervisor

KENDRA LEVITIN
Early Head Start Teacher

MARIA LINDO
Teachers Assistant I

KELSEY LOMBARDI
Project Manager, Children & Family Services Alignment

CLAUDIA LOPEZ
Family Advocate

SARA LOPEZ
Early Head Start Teacher

ANN LOUIS
Instructor,
Peer Education

DELIA LUCIO
Family Advocate

ADRIANA MACIAS
Teacher

MARIA MACIAS
Family Advocate

MARIBEL MAGANA
Supervisor

LINSEY MALDONADO-SCIUTTI
Family Partner

JULIA MAMANI
Teacher

KIRA MANRIQUE
Specialist, ERSEA Enrollment

IRIS MARIN-LIMA
Site Supervisor 

JENNY MARROQUIN
Assistant Teacher

ELIZABETH MARTINEZ-GARCIA
Site Supervisor

NORMA RUBI MARTINEZ-PEREIRA
Associate Teacher II

ANA LUISA MARTINEZ
Associate Teacher II

ANGELICA MARTINEZ
Teacher

JUAN MARTINEZ
Landscaper

SONIA MARTINEZ
Teacher

VIVIANA MARTINEZ
Teacher

ZOILA YANIRA MARTINEZ
Assistant Teacher

ESTHER MATA-PEREZ
Coordinator, Accounts Payable

LEYDIS MATA
Manager, Family Childcare Network

KAREN MAZARIEGOS
Early Head Start Home Visitor

C. GLORIA MCCALLISTER
Family Partner

LETICIA MCCOY
Family Partner

MATTHEW MCCUSKEY
Peer Case Aide

MARY ANNE MCDONOUGH
Family Partner

KYRA MCNICHOLAS
Supervisor

MELISSA MEDINA-SANCHEZ
Administrative Assistant, ERSEA Data & Compliance 

NORMA J MEDINA
Manager, ERSEA

SANAA MEHTAR
Teacher

CHRISTOPHER MIRANDA
Manager, Safety Net Services

GIMMA MOHAMED
Billing Specialist

NURA H MOHAMED
Associate Teacher I

BLANCA MOLINA
Teacher

HASANI MOORE             Peer Support Specialist II

NIDIA MORA
Early Head Start Teacher

GRACE MORRIS
Manager,
Health Services

GARY NEAL
Manager, Facilities

TRACI NICOLAY
Family Services Supervisor

SUSANA NOVALES-BARRERA
Early Head Start Teacher

SYLVIA IGNACIA NOVELLA GALICIA
Teachers Assistant II

LORENA NUNEZ-GUZMAN
Kitchen Aide

REBECA OCHOA
DE OCHOA

Site Assistant

ANNE ORINGER               Peer Case Aide

DEBORA OSORIO
Associate Teacher I

EVELYN PANIAGUA
Program Assistant, Health & Nutrition Services

MORTILA PARADA
Teachers Assistant I

CELESTINA PAREDES
Associate Teacher I

MICHAEL PAYNE
Coordinator,
Mobile Outreach

ROBIN PENCE
Site Supervisor

NORMA PEREIRA
Teachers Assistant II

DANA PEREZ
Peer Case Aide

SARAH PHILIPSHECK
Manager, Operations & Transportation

MARIA PIMENTAL
Associate Teacher I

ANA PINEDA
Family Advocate

LISBETH PINEDA
Teachers Assistant I

PETER PLANTEEN
Manager,
Mobile Outreach

ESTEFANI PORTILLO
Associate Teacher I

HUNTER PRYOR
Information Technology Assistant

WILLIAM PRYOR
Manager, Information Technology

JACQUELINE QUIJADA
Site Assistant

RUTH SORAYA RABANALES
Family Advocate

GLORIA KARINA RAMIREZ DE RAMOS
Assistant Teacher

ANA RAMOS
Assistant Teacher

CARMEN RENDEROS
Assistant Teacher

EMELISA REYES
Assistant Teacher

RUBIA REYES
Assistant Teacher

BRIAN RIORDAN
Accountant

BRENDA
RIVAS-CAMARENA

Director, Family Center

YUSELMI
RODAS-CIFUENTES

Associate Teacher II

GLENDY RODAS-DIAZ
Associate Teacher I

SHEILY
RODAS-MARTINEZ

Associate Teacher II

FLOR RODAS
Associate Teacher I

JOSE RODRIGUEZ
Manager, Kitchen

DEBORA ROGERS
Manager, Family Services

LAURA ROLAND
Facilitites Assistant

JESUS A RUIZ
Bus Driver

BRICIA SANCHEZ
Teachers Assistant II

MADELEINE S SANCHEZ
Early Head Start Home Visitor

ODILIA SANCHEZ
Janitor

ROSA SANCHEZ
Janitor

SILVIA SANCHEZ
Associate Teacher I

TAMMY SANCHEZ
Early Head Start Home Visitor

CARLETTA SAVAGE
Early Head Start Teacher

DEBORAH SAWICKI
Crisis Planning Supervisor

ANNETTE SCHIES
Family Services Supervisor

MARISELA SCOTT
Specialist, Client Intake

PERCY SCOTT
Youth Mentor

LOYOLA SEDANO ASTETE
Associate Teacher I

MARIA SOCORRO SEGURA DE RENTERIA
Associate Teacher II

PATRICIA SERRANO
Associate Teacher II

ALMAS SIDDIQUI
Teachers Assistant I

KENISHA SINEGAL
Mobile Outreach Peer Case Manager

ANDREW SMALL
Peer Case Aide

ANA C SMITH
Early Head Start Home Visitor

MARK SOLOMONS
Family Partner

ANNIE STODDARD
Peer Case Aide

SARA STRAW
Teacher

JANIS STURDEVANT
Manager, Marketing & Communications

CLAUDIA SUAREZ
Program Assistant, Health & Nutrition Services

SUSAN TACHERRA
Site Manager

ELVIRA TAPIA DE CHAVEZ
Assistant Teacher

AMANDA TATUM
Teacher

LIDIA TEJEDA
Assistant Teacher

ANGELICA TERRAZAS
Assistant Teacher

RANDY THOMAS
Peer Counselor

NGHI TRIEU
Early Head Start Teacher

BLANCA UMANA
Early Head Start Teacher

ESTEFANY URIAS
Associate Teacher II

UCINA L VALDEZ
Early Head Start Home Visitor

BUNTAWAN VAMNUTJINDA
Head Start Supervisor

MARIA VARGAS
Janitor

PAOLA VASQUEZ-MARTINEZ
Early Head Start Teacher 

ROSA VAZQUEZ
Associate Teacher I

JESSICA VELASQUEZ
Administrative Assistant

MARIO VELASQUEZ
Janitor

MARGARITA VENCES BAEZ
Teacher

LAURA VERA
Associate Teacher I

YOSELIN VICENTE
Assistant Teacher

ICELA T VILLEDA ALDANA
Teacher

JEA LEA WAGNER
Program Assistant I

DEBRA WALKER
Mobile Outreach Peer Case Manager

LEAH WALTON
Manager, Nutrition Services & Farm

CATHERINE L WARD
Teacher

MICHELLE WEBER
Head Start Teacher

ONA WEIZMANN
Peer Companion Supervisor

PENNY WENDELL
Teacher

DARCY WOODALL
Manager, Enterprise Recovery Center

JANET YARISH
Program Director

REYNA ZAMARRIPA
Site Assistant

DONORS

Over $1 Million

 

California Department of Education

County of Marin

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

 

$100,000 to $999,999

 

California Department of Community Services

Chronicle Season of Sharing Fund

Marin Community Foundation

Murray and Harriet Richards Foundation

Nancy H. and James Kelso Fund

Office of the Administration for Children & Families

U.S. Department of Agriculture

United Way Bay Area

 

$25,000 to $99,999

 

Anonymous

Bank of America

First 5 Marin

Kaiser Permanente

Margaret E. Haas Family Fund

Marin Child Care Council

Northern California Grantmakers

The Morris Stulsaft Foundation

Wells Fargo Foundation

West Marin Fun

$5,000 to $25,000

 

Alexander N. Pascua Fong

Andrew F. and Ann B. Mathieson Fund

Anonymous

Capital One Services LLC

DDC Advocacy LLC

FThree Foundation

Hilltop Foundation

Marin Health

Redwood Credit Union

Susie Tompkins Buell

The Estate of Kenneth M Edlin

The Isabel Allende Foundation

The Kirkpatrick Family Charitable Fund

The San Francisco Foundation

United Way

VWLackey & DonS Fund

 

$1,000 to $4,999

 

Bank of Marin

BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc.

CALCAPA

Cheryl Timoney

Full Circle Fund

George Bertram

Girl Scouts Marin Del Centro Service Unit

Greg Norris Insurance Agency

Hoshun Lam

Randall Fong

Rotary Club of San Rafael Harbor

Stinson Bolinas Community Fund

Susan A. Mills

Ted Abe

United Way Worldwide

Wardell-Smith Raabe Family Fund

West Marin Community Services

$1 to $999

 

Amazon Smile Foundation

Anna J. Reid

Anonymous (4)

Barbara Murphy

Beth Law

Brian Riordan

Bruce Raabe

Chloe I. Erskine

Chris McCrum

D.L. L. Schreck

David J. Guggenhime

Debra Brown

Denis G. Gleason

Donald E. Leisey

Ellis J. Simmons

Elon and Yelena Danziger

Emergency Food and Shelter Program

Esther Mata Perez

Fidelity Charitable

Fillippo Lo Coco

Frank Baratta

Gail Theller

Hermila Gonsalves

Hugh Murphy

Islamic Center of North Marin Charity Fund

Jacqueline Janssen

James Tighe

Jeanne Leu

Jenifer Jayme

Jennifer McInnis

Joanie Levinsohn

Jodi Pickering

John Beuttler

Katherine Catlos

Kenneth Perlmutter

KidsGardening.org Inc.

Kristyn Merritt

Louis Ferrari

Lowell G. Aldrich

Margaret R. Hallett

Mary Jane Burke

Maxine Sattizahn

Michael Beuttler

Nonprofits Insurance Alliance of California

Nora Niesen

Paul Remer

Richard Lundberg

Robert Dell

Robin Steele

Roger Crawford

Roland T. Minami

Ronald J. Burlick

Russell Hill

Sandra Huey

Sandra Woliver

Smarter Good

Sue Krenek & Sam Penrose

Susan Walters

The Julio R. Gallo Foundation

The Robert J. Duncan Trust

William Gale

Zhihong Li

OUR PROMISE.

Community Action changes people’s lives, embodies the spirit of hope, improves communities and makes America a better place to live. We care about the entire community, and we are dedicated to helping people help themselves and each other.

Download your own PDF copy of our 2020 Annual Report

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